Tuesday, 20 June 2017

The end of the age of the dinosaurs

If the asteroid that hit our planet ~ 66 million years ago and wiped out the dinosaurs, had hit the planet perhaps as little as 2 seconds later, it might have fallen into the ocean instead of shallow water and hence the consequences would have been very different. There would have been vastly less vaporised rock and sunlight could have still reached the Earth's surface in the following weeks and months. Hence the temperature all over the planet wouldn't have catastrophically fallen. Hence the dinosaurs might not have been wiped out. Hence human beings might never have evolved.

The fact that human beings ever came into being is an extraordinarily unlikely series of events. But then, what do we make of the notion that there is an ultimate purpose to our lives? That we were born for some ultimate purpose? On the surface, it might seem incompatible with any such purpose since we're here by sheer colossally unlikely blind happenstance. 

There's stuff here I think that we're simply not understanding. Perhaps if dinosaurs had survived, they would have evolved into intelligent creatures comparable to our intelligence? Perhaps our souls might have inhabited these dinosaur descendants? Lots of questions, lots of speculations. But all very interesting -- well . . at least I find it interesting!


1 comment:

  1. How many people do you think ever sit back long enough to even think about something like this?

    I think we distract ourselves with work and movies and sports to avoid having to think about things like this.

    People fight blind happenstance because their ego can't handle it being true about themselves. Telling someone they're not that important is like telling them they're ugly. A horrible possibility, therefore no ugly people have ever existed ever.

    When it rains and loads of earthworms come up to dry out and die in the heat or get eaten by birds, I don't think about what their ultimate purpose was because I don't give a lick about them. But me myself, I'm far too important to be like them. But when I pull back and realize we haven't always been here and someday will be gone, I don't think we're all that different from earthworms.

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